Fusor – Vacuum

It becomes increasingly evident that achieving sufficient pressures to allow for fusion to occur will be the greatest challenge. We must aim for a near vacuum of 1 micron, 0.13332239 Pa and then allow deuterium in, to raise the pressure to 5-15 microns, at which the fusors tend to work best. Biggest obstacle is the cost of the pumps, a turbo pump and a common vacuum pump. Turbo pumps are apparently either rarely functional or ridiculously expensive and require more parts to function which they are not usually sold with. I forsee it will be a pain to acquire one and make it function properly. In other respects the community agrees that everything is relatively easy. It’s just the pumps…

As I read different posts among the ‘amateurs’ of fusion I came to see that they imagine themselves as highly important to the progress in fusion. They are very proud and that is certainly commendable, but I don’t see how fusors and DIY wizards will move science in 21st century in such a complicated area as fusion, the problem is not in the lack of brains but in the lack of resources these people possess. Some are certainly very determined to learn and educate themselves, one of the people I chatted to claimed to have spent 2 years studying the physics of vacuum, nuclear and electrical engineering. Very impressive, but fusion achieved from fusors is not serious research or area of activity, the machine is too inefficient and doesn’t even assume a plasma containment mechanism.